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People often think of innovation as something coming through a radical change. It is more a matter of continuous improvement. The word “innovation” itself is derived from the Latin verb “Innovare”, which means to renew. Providing fertile ground for continuous innovation is paramount to the long-term success of any organisation. Unfortunately, we often see organisations fall short of unlocking the full creative potential of their workforce due to significant innovation inhibitors.
Innovation unlocked: Top 10 innovation inhibitors and how to address them with sotfware (5)
Innovation inhibitors and workplace stressors partially overlap. On one end, workplace stressors have much wider ranging effects on the organisation and employee culture. On the other end, workplace stressors are only one of the innovation inhibitors, of which the list is much longer.
Innovation unlocked: Top 10 innovation inhibitors and how to address them with sotfware (4)
While reading articles on rehumanise.net, if you come across a paragraph you like, double-click or double-tap on it to save it in your personal library. You can then decide whether or not you want to share it on social media. All saved paragraphs will appear on this page.
Thoughts worth sharing (3)
To avoid business disruption, organisations are rapidly turning towards automation as a safer (and more financially attractive) solution compared to the human workforce. In fact, according to a recent report from the World Economic Forum, the next wave of automation will disrupt 85m jobs worldwide by 2025.  
Socially responsible automation=Growth? (2)
In 2016, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) published a report titled Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems. The report explored the lack of awareness and ownership of socioeconomic concerns surrounding automation. It urged stakeholders involved in developing autonomous systems and AI to go beyond the search for more computational power. It pleaded for human wellbeing, empowerment and prosperity to be placed at the core of automation pursuits. 
Socially responsible automation=Growth? (1)
A paper on Socially Responsible Automation (SRA), defines it as “the technology choices, business strategies, innovation approaches and management practices that move the affordances of automation beyond cost and performance.”
Socially responsible automation=Growth? (1)
While we can say that less stress means more room for creativity, if not balanced correctly, it can also veer off towards a lazy innovation culture. We have seen plenty of examples of this. It is enough to think about Nokia or Blackberry to be reminded.
Innovation unlocked: Top 10 innovation inhibitors and how to address them with sotfware (1)
Social responsibility and business ethics are often used interchangeably. However, social responsibility is only a part of the overall discipline of business ethics. 
Socially responsible automation=Growth? (1)
Social responsibility involves weighing actions and decisions, particularly as it affects people. A responsible company considers and recognises the impact that its decisions and activities have on society and the environment. The organisation also behaves in a manner that positively contributes to society’s sustainable development, health and welfare.
Socially responsible automation=Growth? (1)
At the core of the idea lies a premise that business leaders must proactively work on identifying more revenue streams and job-enabling growth as they roll out and refine automation. 
Socially responsible automation=Growth? (1)